The title of this blog post is a quote from Michael Corboy, the assistant commissioner of police in New South Wales, Australia. He used that phrase to describe the introduction of traffic cameras that use an AI to detect when drivers are on the phone.

I think it’s a profound phrase. In one sense, it’s backward from how we normally like to think about the relationship between technology systems and culture: we want our culture to grow organically, and our technology systems to be designed around them, in a humane way that preserves and supports our values. Intuitively, the culture should affect the system rather than the other way around.

But in another sense, this acknowledges a very real and basic phenomenon that happens any time a system is introduced into a culture: the culture changes. Now, the intended changes rarely obtain exactly the way they’re meant to, at least without unintended side-effects, but the relationship between human culture and manmade systems is definitely a two-way street.

These traffic cameras will have some impact on traffic safety in NSW. And, they will incite some amount of backlash from people who feel intruded upon by Big Brother. But a lot of people will respond with indifference, and these cameras might even further normalize and legitimize the idea of high-tech government surveillance.

From the government’s standpoint, it will be nearly impossible to go back to a lower-tech alternative if this initiative does not succeed, so these cameras also mean a redefining of what it means for law enforcement to do their job. They signal an increasing dependence on computers and automation to replace human labor and judgment. And will the cameras actually change Australians’ culture around traffic safety? If so, how?

Time will tell whether the introduction of these cameras is a good thing in the end, but as always it is much bigger than just the adoption of one system.

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